Blackboard/Angel Antitrust, Broadband Funds, Bryan Alexander, Faculty Development, Statistics, Lurking Professors, Web Privacy

Department of Justice Opens Investigation of Blackboard’s Purchase of Angel Learning
by Jeffrey R. Young
May 27, 2009, Chronicle of Higher Ed

“Last week the U.S. Department of Justice opened an investigation into the impact of Blackboard’s purchase of rival Angel Learning on competition in the course-management market.”

“Blackboard filed a report Friday with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, disclosing that the investigation is underway. ‘On Friday, May 22, 2009, the Company received a voluntary request for information from the U.S. Department of Justice relating to the Acquisition and its related impact on competition under applicable antitrust law,’ said the filing, signed by Matthew Small, Blackboard’s chief legal officer.” . . .

“Camelia C. Mazard, a partner at the Washington law firm Doyle, Barlow, & Mazard PLLC who specializes in anti-trust law, said Blackboard’s latest acquisition could raise enough concern to cause the Justice Department to undo the deal, though such moves are rare. ‘In my opinion this gives them a virtual monopoly in a narrow market,’ Ms. Mazard said in an interview Wednesday.”

Broadband Technology Opportunities Program: NTIA Reports Confirm Application Timeline, Shed Light on Criteria
May 22, 2009, Dow, Lohnes and Albertson Client Advisory

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (NTIA) will likely accept applications for the first round of the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program grants in July-September 2009, reports the Washington law firm Dow, Lownes and Albertson.  Here is the timeline:

– Release of first BTOP Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) – late June or early July

– Acceptance of grant applications – early-to-mid July through mid-to-late September

– NTIA review of grant applications – late September through mid-to-late December

– Announcement of first round grant awards – late December

– NTIA will accept second round applications during the fourth quarter of 2009 and third round applications in the second quarter of 2010.

The Recovery.gov Web site (http://www.recovery.gov/) lists NTIA’s five evaluation measures: job creation, expanded broadband access, stimulated private investment, high-speed access to “strategic institutions,” and encouraged broadband demand.  NTIA will award grants for the construction of wireline and wireless broadband networks, which implies wireless projects will be included in the definition of “broadband.”  NTIA will only fund networks “in areas of the country with limited or no broadband access.”  This conforms to comments Rick Boucher (D-VA), House Communications, Technology, and the Internet Subcommittee chairman, made last week that, in addition to totally unserved areas, NTIA focus on creating competition and choice in areas where access is either slow or prohibitively expensive.

Apprehending the Future: Emerging Technologies, from Science Fiction to Campus Reality
by Bryan Alexander
May/June 2009, Educause Review

. . . “Deciding which technologies to support for teaching and learning — and how to support them — depends, first, on our ability to learn about each emerging development. Selecting a platform without knowing what is coming right behind it can be risky. Similarly, it is folly to grasp onto a technology without seeing the variety of ways that the technology can actually be used. If William Gibson was right – ‘the street finds its own uses for things’ — then academic computing needs to be sure of its ‘street smarts.’ “1

“But trying to grapple with what comes next is a deep problem. Doing so is partly a matter of science fiction, which consists, after all, of the stories we tell about the future. Doing so is also an issue of complexity, since each practice, or device, or network, or application comes embedded in a nest of other practices, or devices, or networks, or applications. Emerging technologies are a matter not only of qualitative challenge but also of sheer quantitative overload. Web 2.0, gaming, wireless and mobile devices, virtual worlds, even Web 3.0 in all its unrealized potential — each churns out new developments daily and connects with other domains to ramp up the problem still further.” . . .

A Web Game for Predicting Some Futures: Exploring the Wisdom of Crowds
by Bryan Alexander
May/June 2009, Educause Review

. . . “After a year of exploration, NITLE has derived some lessons about gaming and emergence. First, players tend to prefer relatively short-lived propositions. Terms of several months or even weeks attract more trading and interaction that terms lasting for one year or more.  Second, e-mail remains a powerful communication medium, even for a Web 2.0 project such as this one. Consistently, spikes in game activity occur after e-mail updates. Third, market trading is autonomous. Although an administrator can shape a proposition with a specific outcome in mind, traders often drive values in very different directions. This can be seen as a virtue in several different ways, not the least of which is broadening discussion and increasing variety. Finally, games can attract academics to serious play. Intense conversations, passionate trading, and competitive relationships have all emerged in the NITLE Prediction Markets, as players have attempted to better understand the near future.” . . .

Charting the Course and Tapping the Community: The EDUCAUSE Top Teaching and Learning Challenges 2009
by Julie K. Little and Carie Page, with Kristen Betts, Stephanie Boone, Patrick Faverty, Tanya Joosten, Elizabeth A. Kiggins, Jessica Knott, Erin Long, Alana J. Mauger, Jeffrey McClurken, Maureen McCreadie, Nils Peterson, and Celeste M. Schwartz
May/June 2009, Educause Review

. . . “Keeping faculty one step ahead of emerging technologies — and providing them with the support to manage what often feels like a rising tide of new tools and learning research — can indeed be difficult. Managing the widening gulf between early adopters and less technologically savvy faculty can be downright frustrating. And then there’s the delicate balance between promoting technology tools and encouraging teaching and learning with technology.” . . .

Top Five Challenges:

1. Creating Learning Environments That Promote Active Learning, Critical Thinking, Collaborative Learning, and Knowledge Creation

2. Developing 21st-Century Literacies (Information, Digital, and Visual) among Students and Faculty

3. Reaching and Engaging Today’s Learners

4. Encouraging Faculty Adoption and Innovation in Teaching and Learning with IT

5: Advancing Innovation in Teaching and Learning with Technology in an Era of Budget Cuts

“EDUCAUSE developed a social network dedicated to the project using Ning (http://tlchallenges09.ning.com/) and invited participants to create unique profiles and “join” the community. Within the interface, members could create working groups, post blog entries, start discussion threads, or simply add photos from their campus. Wikis were selected as the “workspace” for the project, a central home for all the resources generated around each challenge.” . . .

“The wikis, housed on the EDUCAUSE website (http://www.educause.edu/wiki/TLChallenges09), offer a place for community members to share content around each challenge, including multimedia (such as a webcast with faculty discussing institutional responses to the budget crisis), suggested readings, or “community snapshots” (brief examples of how institutions are responding to the challenges). Each wiki contribution includes the name of a contact person, helping to develop the most important resource of all: peer-to-peer engagement. As the project grows, these wikis are becoming the online repository for the community’s ideas.” . . .

Faculty Development for the 21st Century
by Veronica Diaz, Maricopa Community Colleges; P. B. Garrett, The George Washington University; Edward R. Kinley, Indiana State University; and John F. Moore Virginia Tech
May/June 2009, Educause Review

. .  . “In the 21st century, colleges and universities need to consider faculty development programs in the same way that they view academic programs for their Net Gen and Millennial students. In other words, successful faculty development programs should include mentoring, delivery in a variety of on-campus and off-campus formats (face-to-face, blended, online, self-initiated/self-paced), and anyplace/anytime programming to accommodate just-in-time needs. Faculty members are learners with needs and constraints similar to those of students. Support programs must be valuable, relevant, current, and engaging. They should also demonstrate best practices in providing a participatory, facilitated learning environment. In addition, faculty development programs should address the multiple roles and needs of the faculty member as facilitator, teacher, advisor, mentor, and researcher. Institutions should also consider that offering a dynamic faculty development program will serve not only full-time, but also part-time faculty—relied on heavily by some institutions. Finally, faculty development can occur outside official programs: internal opportunities can include serving on and/or leading committees, writing and administering grants, and designing and facilitating official faculty development programs; external development opportunities can include attending conferences, furthering academic studies, conducting research projects, and collaborating with colleagues from other institutions.”

Findings From The Condition of Education 2009: Student Educational Progress Shows Modest Gains
May 28, 2009, National Center for Education Statistics

“Enrollment in America’s elementary and secondary schools continues to rise to all-time highs, and younger learners continue to show gains in educational achievement over time.  The overall achievement levels of secondary school students have not risen over time, but there are some increases in the percentages of students entering college after high school and earning a postsecondary credential, according to “The Condition of Education 2009” report released today by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).” . . .

“The Condition of Education” is a congressionally mandated report that provides an annual portrait of education in the United States. The 46 indicators included in this year’s report cover all aspects of education, from early childhood through postsecondary education and from student achievement to school environment and resources.”

Among the report’s other findings:

– Public elementary and secondary enrollment is projected to increase to 54 million in 2018. Over the period of 2006 to 2018, the South is projected to experience the largest increase (18 percent) in the number of students enrolled.

– Between 1972 and 2007, the percentage of public school students who were White decreased from 78 to 56 percent. This decrease largely reflects the growth in the number of students who were Hispanic, particularly in the West.

– The average reading and mathematics scores on the long-term trend National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) were higher in 2008 than in the early 1970s for 9- and 13-year-olds; scores for 17-year-olds were not measurably different over the same period.

– In 2005-06, about three-quarters of the 2002-03 freshman class graduated from high school with a regular diploma.

– The rate of college enrollment immediately after high school completion increased from 49 percent in 1972 to 67 percent by 1997, but has since fluctuated between 62 and 69 percent.

– About 58 percent of first-time students seeking a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent and attending a 4-year institution full time in 2000-01 completed a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent at that institution within 6 years.

– The percentage of 25- to 29-year-olds completing a bachelor’s degree or higher increased from 17 to 29 percent between 1971 and 2000 and was 31 percent in 2008.

– Women accounted for 57 percent of the bachelor’s degrees and 62 percent of all associate’s degrees awarded in the 2006-07 academic year.

Online Professors Pose as Students to Encourage Real Learning
by Marc Parry
May 26, 2009, Chronicle of Higher Education

“Jane Malan and Bill Reed are cousins in deception. They infiltrate online courses and secretly collect information about students by blending in with them.” . . . “Both Mr. Reed and Ms. Malan are the alter egos of real professors. As The Chronicle reports today, the characters belong to a small group of “ghost students” that academics in Indiana, Connecticut, and South Africa have injected into online courses to kick-start discussions among students, keep them from dropping out, and spy on their communications.”

“The deceit has provoked questions about faculty ethics. Two of the professors admit that their unreal students teeter on an ethical precipice, because the technique could be abused. Others in the distance-education community accuse them of falling over the cliff. The critics worry such behavior could scar the image of an education sector many still regard with skepticism.”

Law Students Teach Scalia About Privacy and the Web
by Noam Cohen
May 17, 2009, New York Times

. . . “This spring, the students of an elective course on Internet privacy at Fordham Law School experienced a number of fascinating “teaching moments” during an assignment meant to demonstrate how much personal information is floating around online.  The assignment from the class’s professor, Joel R. Reidenberg, was, admittedly, a bit provocative: create a dossier about Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia from what can be found on the Internet.”

“Why Justice Scalia? Well, the class had been discussing his recent dismissive comments about Internet privacy concerns at a conference. His summation, as reported by The Associated Press: ‘Every single datum about my life is private? That’s silly.’  . . . Yet the class managed to create a dossier of 15 pages, Professor Reidenberg reported to a conference on privacy at Fordham, that included the justice’s home address and home phone number, his wife’s personal e-mail address and the TV shows and food he prefers.” . . .

Blackboard/Angel Antitrust, Broadband Funds, Bryan Alexander, Faculty Development, Statistics, Lurking Professors, Web Privacy

Tipping Point, Captcha, eTextbooks, Global Campus, Google Library, Angel, NITLE, Journal on eLearning, Community Service, Media College

The Distance Ed Tipping Point
by Scott Jaschik
May 26, 2009, Inside Higher Ed

“As colleges moved into distance education, many questions were raised about how they could serve this new group of students. And colleges responded, with new ideas about online learning resources, academic advising online and so forth.  But what about after distance education takes off? At what point does the question shift from what a college does to offer quality online programs to how a college needs to change in its entirety when it reaches a tipping point in enrollments — and at what point does such a change take place?” . . .

“Mattina and others from his college discussed several of the choices colleges need to make [faculty hiring and training, faculty expectations, local ties and technology infrastructure] as they reach either 50 percent or some other critical mass where the institution is changed by the success of its distance offerings.”

New Puzzles that Tell Humans from Machines
by Anne Eisenberg
May 23, 2009, New York Times

“Rogue programs try their best to register at Web sites and then wreak havoc, but a clever puzzle often bars them from entry: a set of distorted, squiggly letters and numbers that people can decipher and type correctly for admission, but that machines still can’t. Well, at least for the moment.”

“Now, to stay one jump ahead of fraudsters and their automated programs, researchers are devising more versions of the puzzles, called captchas, to help sites block abuse that includes spam e-mail, illegal postings and skewed online voting. Researchers at Google are testing a new captcha that requires people to turn upright randomly rotated images, like that of a parrot perched temporarily upside-down on a leafy branch. The task is a breeze for people — using a cellphone touchscreen, for example, to flip the image — but hard for machines.” . . .

California Considers Open Digital Textbooks
by Maya T. Prabhu
May 21, 2009, eSchool News

“In what could be a first-of-its-kind statewide initiative, California education leaders are working together to compile a list of free, open digital textbooks that meet state-approved standards and will be available to high school math and science classes this fall.”

“At the request of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Secretary of Education Glen Thomas will work with State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O’Connell and State Board of Education President Ted Mitchell to develop the list of standards-aligned, open educational resources. The advisory report is scheduled to be released by Aug. 10.  Currently, there is no statewide review of ninth- through 12th-grade instructional materials in California, said Tom Adams, director of the curriculum frameworks and instructional resources division of the California Department of Education. There is, however, a textbook adoption process in place for kindergarten through eighth grade.” . . .

Global Campus Employees Got Bonuses Despite Program’s Struggles
by Jodi S. Cohen
May 22, 2009, Chicago Tribune

“On the same day that University of Illinois officials voted to reshape the troubled Global Campus program, the university’s president disclosed that he approved bonuses last year for senior employees of the online operation. Even as Global Campus struggled, 10 staff members received bonus payments equal to 7 to 9 percent of their salaries based on their performance during the program’s first year. The payments, totaling $122,219, ranged from $6,732 to $19,040.” . . .

“At their board meeting Thursday, trustees voted to move away from an independent Global Campus operation and charged the three campuses with developing and running more online programs instead. There are still expected to be some centralized functions, possibly involving current employees. In voting for the new approach, trustees said they were not satisfied with the progress of the 2-year-old Global Campus or the $10 million invested in the effort.”

The Evolving Google Library
by Scott Jaschik
May 21, 2009, Inside Higher Ed

“To some, Google’s mammoth book digitization project with university libraries is the ultimate combination of technology and scholarship, potentially making millions of volumes available to audiences that could never visit major research libraries in person. To others, the project represents a dangerous centralization and corporatization of content.  Complicating the debate (and obviously there are many viewpoints somewhere in between) has been an uncertainty about how Google would make the new library available. On Wednesday, Google and the University of Michigan announced new details — and while the plan for pricing was still vague, the basics of the model became more clear.”

“Google is pledging free “preview” access to all books in the collection, inexpensive ways for individuals to purchase digital access to a full book, and pricing (based for postsecondary institutions on Carnegie Classifications) that would make it possible for colleges to buy site licenses to the collections. Google also says it is putting in place an arbitration system that will assure colleges that it will not overcharge for access. Some of the terms described by Google appear to be designed to win over skeptics in the library and publishing world, but some of those observers said it was too early to tell if the company had gone far enough, especially since it hasn’t released some pricing details.” . . .

An Indiana Institution Wins Big in Blackboard’s Purchase of Angel Learning
by Jeffrey R. Young
May 19, 2009, Chronicle of Higher Education

“Though some college officials complained last week about Blackboard’s purchase of Angel Learning, the university that first developed the Angel software heralded the sale as an unprecedented windfall.”

“Angel’s software was born as a research project at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis. The university held about a 25-percent stake in Angel Learning when Blackboard acquired the company this month for $95-million. University officials confirmed that the university received about $23-million from the sale, an ample return on its initial investment of about $135,000 and the use of some professors’ time.” . . .

Technology and Liberal Education
by Scott Jaschik
May 19, 2009, Inside Higher Ed

“Many educators at smaller, undergraduate oriented colleges and universities have long been frustrated that they don’t always have the technology options of large research universities. A small nonprofit that since 2001 has tried to remedy that problem is today announcing new leadership, a new location and plans for a major expansion.”

“The National Institute for Technology and Liberal Education (known by its acronym NITLE) was created by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation as part of Ithaka, a program designed to encourage experimentation and adoption of new uses in technology in scholarly publishing and academe in general. NITLE, which currently involves about 130 colleges, is spinning off to become its own organization, will move to Southwestern University, and plans to involve many more colleges than ever before.”

“The organization is also announcing a new executive director, who has been involved in several significant efforts to make teaching materials or scholarship available free and online — and who wants to promote that open access ideal with NITLE. W. Joseph King, the new executive director, has been executive director of Connexions, a Rice University-based project to share educational materials at no cost, and he is board chair of Rice University Press, the only university press to be exclusively online.” . . .

Design Considerations for Today’s Online Learners: A Study of Personalized, Relationship-Based Social Awareness Information
by Misook Heo, Duquesne University
July 2009, International Journal on E-Learning

Abstract: This article examined online learners’ preferences in personalized, relationship-based social awareness information sharing in course management systems. Three hundred seventy-seven online learners’ willingness to share social awareness information was measured through a national survey. Results indicated that today’s online learners are open minded in sharing social awareness information and their trust of course management systems is high. They prefer sharing information with more authoritative figures such as teachers. Differences among age groups existed, but none of the generations were consistently more open in sharing social awareness information. Overall, a strong preference in personalized, relationship-based social awareness information sharing was found. Instructors of online courses and designers of course management systems need to consider these characteristics of today’s online learners in their design. This would help online learners to acknowledge themselves as feeling, intentional, thinking, and social human beings. This will cause improved learner interaction and engagement and eventually a successful online learning experience.

A Case Study Analysis of Factors that Influence Attrition Rates in Voluntary Online Training Programs
July 2009, International Journal on E-Learning
by Lori Long, Baldwin-Wallace College; Cathy Dubois, Robert Faley, Kent State University

Abstract: This article examines utilization of online training courses in a Midwest-based landscaping company in the United States. The company had implemented online training to facilitate employee development for their 5,000 employees who were in locations throughout the United States. The courses had been in place for about a decade before the organization attempted to evaluate their effectiveness. In the 14-month process of collecting data to evaluate course effectiveness, researchers discovered that only 21% of employees who enrolled in online training during this time period actually completed the training. This finding surprised researchers and company management and motivated an investigation into the causes underlying this high rate of attrition. Attrition survey data revealed that attrition was not due to dissatisfaction with course design, technology, or content. Rather, lack of time available both at work and at home was the principal factor that contributed to course attrition. Additional contributing factors included course enrollment procedures, low employee motivation, and employee turnover. Recommendations for implementation of online training in organizational settings are offered.

Methods for Evaluating Learner Activities with New Technologies: Guidelines for the Lab@Future Project
by Daisy Mwanza-Simwami, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK; Yrjö Engeström, Centre for Activity Theory & Developmental Work Research, University of Helsinki, Finland; Tomaz Amon, Center for Scientific Visualization, Ljubljana, Slovenia
July 2009, International Journal on E-Learning

Abstract: The task of evaluating learner activities with new technologies is becoming increasingly complex because traditional evaluation strategies do not adequately consider the unique and often dynamic characteristics of learners and activities carried out. Learner activities are largely driven by motives and relationships that exist in the context in which learning takes place. The article draws insights from theories of human activity and learning in order to understand learners and activities carried out using new technologies. Theory-informed guidelines were abstracted from activity theory and the theory of expansive learning and presented as a method for evaluating learner activities in an international project funded by the European Union (EU), specifically, Lab@Future. We describe basic features of the theories and use a case study to present an example implementation of the theory-informed guidelines used as a method for evaluating learner activities with new technologies. The ultimate goal of this study was to establish a method for applying activity theory-based pedagogical insight to the evaluation of learner activities in the Lab@Future project. The article concludes by reflecting on the benefits of using theory-informed guidelines as a method for evaluating learner activities with new technologies.

Grant Opportunity: Corporation for National and Community Service
National Providers of Training and Technical Assistance Grant

Application Deadline: July 2, 2009, 5:00pm eastern time
Estimated Total Program Funding: $8 million
Eligibility: State and local government entities, non-profit organizations, institutions of higher education, Indian tribes, and commercial entities

The Corporation for National and Community Service (the Corporation) announces the availability of approximately $8 million for the first year of potential three-year cooperative agreements to fund organizations to provide training and technical assistance (TTA) to build the capacity of local programs and organizations that use service and volunteering to meet community needs. Funding for years two through three of each agreement is contingent upon the availability of funds and the recipient’s demonstrated results and satisfactory progress towards agreed-upon objectives.

Media College.com

“MediaCollege.com is a free educational and resource Web site for all forms of electronic media. Topics include video and television production, audio work, photography, graphics, Web design and more. We have hundreds of exclusive tutorials with supporting illustrations, videos, sound bytes and interactive features. You’ll also find reference material, utilities and other useful goodies, as well as a helpful forum. Everything here is 100 percent free with no strings attached — we only ask that you respect our terms and conditions. We produce this website because we love it and we want you to love it too.”  This site is authored and maintained by Wavelength Media, a multi-media production company in New Zealand.

Tipping Point, Captcha, eTextbooks, Global Campus, Google Library, Angel, NITLE, Journal on eLearning, Community Service, Media College

ITC 2009 Leadership Academy – July 26-28, 2009, Costa Mesa, Calif. – Application Deadline Extended: May 29, 2009

ITC Announces Inaugural Offering of the ITC Leadership Academy – July 26-28, 2009

The ITC Leadership Academy is designed to develop and enrich the leadership skills of distance learning professionals in higher educational settings.  Ideal candidates would include distance learning administrators or learning technologies administrators with three or more years of managerial experience in a distance learning program.

Along with a group of approximately 25 fellow professionals from throughout North America, participants will gain the opportunity to:

– Understand your organization and create a sound leadership strategy for your environment

– Develop a leadership model that fits your institution

– Identify and acquire key tools for successful leadership in distance learning

– Build a network of colleagues and fellow practitioners

The three-day academy will be held in beautiful Costa Mesa, a community of Orange County, California. Sunday-Tuesday, July 26-28, 2009.

Deadline to submit an application is May 29, 2009

Visit the Academy Web site at http://www.itcnetwork.org/academy/ for more information and application form.

ITC 2009 Leadership Academy – July 26-28, 2009, Costa Mesa, Calif. – Application Deadline Extended: May 29, 2009

Higher Education Opportunity Act – Student Authentication — Secure Login and Password

I just attended the third and final meeting of the Negotiated Rulemaking Committee which the U.S. Department of Education created to discuss accreditation issues within the Higher Education Opportunity Act which was passed in February 2009.  The committee will continue to meet through the morning of Wednesday, May 20th to discuss the issues in the new law that apply to accreditation, but the committee has agreed to the new regulations that will pertain most directly to distance education.

As I mentioned in the e-mail I sent ITC members on May 1, the negotiated rulemaking committee quickly agreed to modify the definition of a correspondence and distance education course (see sections 600.2 and 602.3 below), but there was quite some discussion, and suggestions for changes to the language that pertains to distance learning student authentication (see section 602.17 below).

Thank you for all of your help on this – for giving us guidance on what the final outcome should be.  Once again, Jim Hermes from the American Association of Community Colleges did an excellent job championing the interests of distance educators during the meetings.  We also owe a lot of thanks to ITC chair Fred Lokken from Truckee Meadows Community College for staying on top of this issue from the get go!  I think we have reason to celebrate!  Chris

Here is the regulatory language the Negotiated Rulemaking Committee agreed to.  I guess there is always the possibility for change as long as the committee is meeting, but here is what the committee agreed to this morning:

Higher Education Act

602.17 Application of standards in reaching an accreditation decision.

(g) Requires institutions that offer distance education or correspondence education to have processes in place through which the institution establishes that the student who registers in a distance education or correspondence education course or program is the same student who participates in and completes the course or program and receives the academic credit. The agency meets this requirement if it —

(1) Requires institutions to verify the identity of a student who participates in class or coursework by using, at the option of the institution, methods such as —

(i) A secure login and pass code;
(ii) proctored examinations; and
(iii) New or other technologies and practices that are effective in verifying student identification;

(2) Makes clear in writing that institutions must use processes that protect student privacy and notify students of projected additional student charges associated with verification of student identity, if any , at the time of registration or enrollment.

600.2 Definitions

Correspondence course:
(1) A course provided by an institution under which the institution provides instructional materials, by mail or electronic transmission, including examinations on the materials, to students who are separated from the instructor. Interaction between the instructor and the student is limited, is not regular and substantive, and is primarily initiated by the student. Correspondence courses are typically self-paced.
(2) If a course is part correspondence and part residential training, the Secretary considers the course to be a correspondence course.
(3) A correspondence course is not considered distance education.

602.16 Accreditation and preaccreditation standards.

(c) If the agency has or seeks to include within its scope of recognition the evaluation of the quality of institutions or programs offering distance education or correspondence education, the agency’s standards must effectively address the quality of an institution’s distance education or correspondence education in the areas identified in (a) (1). The agency is not required to have separate standards, procedures, or policies for the evaluation of distance education or correspondence education;

602.3

Correspondence Education means:

(1) Education provided through one or more courses by an institution under which the institution provides institutional materials, by mail or electronic transmission, including examinations on the materials, to students who are separated from the instructor.

(2) Interaction between the instructor and the student is limited, is not regular and substantive, and is primarily initiated by the student.

(3) Correspondence courses are typically self-paced.

(4) Correspondence education is not distance education.

Distance education means education that uses one or more of the technologies listed in paragraphs (1) though (4) to deliver instruction to students who are separated from the instructor and to support regular and substantive interaction between the students and the instructor, either synchronously or asynchronously. The technologies may include —

(1) The internet
(2) One-way and two-way transmissions through open broadcast, closed circuit, cable, microwave, broadband lines, fiber optics, satellite, or wireless communications devices;
(3) Audioconferencing; or(4) Video cassettes, DVDs, and CD-ROMs, if the cassettes, DVDs, or CD-ROMs are used in a course in conjunction with any of the technologies listed in paragraphs (1) through (3).

Higher Education Opportunity Act – Student Authentication — Secure Login and Password

ITC Leadership Academy – July 26-28, 2009, Costa Mesa, California – Application Deadline May 20, 2009

ITC Announces Inaugural Offering of the ITC Leadership Academy – July 26-28, 2009

The ITC Leadership Academy is designed to develop and enrich the leadership skills of distance learning professionals in higher educational settings.  Ideal candidates would include distance learning administrators or learning technologies administrators with three or more years of managerial experience in a distance learning program.

Along with a group of approximately 25 fellow professionals from throughout North America, participants will gain the opportunity to:

– Understand your organization and create a sound leadership strategy for your environment

– Develop a leadership model that fits your institution

– Identify and acquire key tools for successful leadership in distance learning

– Build a network of colleagues and fellow practitioners

The three-day academy will be held in beautiful Costa Mesa, a community of Orange County, California. Sunday-Tuesday, July 26-28, 2009.

Deadline to submit an application is May 20, 2009

Visit the Academy Web site at http://www.itcnetwork.org/academy/ for more information and application form.

ITC Leadership Academy – July 26-28, 2009, Costa Mesa, California – Application Deadline May 20, 2009