Grant Opportunity: E-Teacher Scholarship Program and Professional Development Workshop

E-Teacher Scholarship Program and Professional Development Workshop
Office of English Language Programs, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
U.S. Department of State

This program will providing funding to an accredited U.S. post-secondary educational institution (or consortia of such institutions) to carry out two responsibilities: 1.) provide seven 10-12 week online, university-level English language teaching professional development courses during the U.S. academic year 2009-2010. The courses will familiarize participants with U.S. student-centered teaching methods and the latest methods and techniques in teaching English as a foreign language. 2.) a three-week professional development workshop for 26 foreign English language teaching professionals to take place in the summer of 2010.  The workshop will focus on methodology, linguistic enhancement, educational leadership, cultural interchange, and “best practices” in the classroom. Participants will be encouraged to develop a teacher-training project to implement in their home countries following the exchange program.

Application Deadline: June 8, 2009

Funding Amount: $750,000: $550,000 for the E-Teacher Scholarship Program and $200,000 for the E-Teacher Professional Development Workshop.

E-Teacher Scholarship Program

Under the close and direct supervision of the Office of English Language Programs (ECA/A/L), the recipient organization will provide seven different ten- to twelve-week online, university level English Language Teaching (ELT) professional development courses during the U.S. academic year 2009-2010. The courses will familiarize participants with U.S. student-centered teaching methods and the latest methods and techniques in teaching English as a Foreign Language. To build on and incorporate components of ECA/A/L’s existing materials in “Shaping the Way We Teach English,” three of the courses should be Assessment, Critical Thinking, and Teaching English to Young Learners. Each course should include some of the materials from “Shaping the Way We Teach English,” specifically the video segments. The course provider should expand and update these materials, as appropriate to create the full course. The remaining courses should be relevant to the professional development of English language teachers worldwide and may include, for example, Teaching Grammar Communicatively, General Methodology, or other essential aspects of English language teaching, as well as courses in English for Specific Purposes (ESP), such as English for Business or English for Law. These additional courses should incorporate a video component, similar to the format of the “Shaping” modules, which may be used by ECA/A/L in its teacher training programs with English language teachers abroad. The proposal should include for each course projected dates and a syllabus of content. The award recipient must subsequently submit for each course an annotated bibliography of recommended titles (approximately fifteen-twenty titles per course). ECA/A/L retains the right to print, publish, repurpose, and distribute abroad the bibliography in all media, including electronic media, and in all languages and editions.

E-Teacher Professional Development Workshop

Under the supervision of the Office of English Language Programs (ECA/A/L), the recipient will design and administer one three-week professional development workshop for twenty-six foreign English language teaching professionals nominated by the U.S. Embassies’ Public Affairs Section with input from the Regional English Language Officer (RELO) and approved by ECA/A/L. The workshop, which will be implemented in the summer of 2010, will focus on methodology, linguistic enhancement, educational leadership, cultural interchange, and “best practices” in the classroom. The participants will be encouraged to develop a teacher-training project to implement in their home countries following the exchange program.

The workshop should encompass the following elements:

(a) Orientation upon arrival in the U.S.;

(b) Intensive education in relevant topics and language teaching methodologies;

(c) Cultural and community service activities to encourage interaction and mutual understanding.

Applicant organizations should submit a narrative outlining a comprehensive strategy for the administration and implementation of the program. The narrative should include a design for the program, a syllabus of course content, and a plan for monitoring and evaluating the foreign English teachers’ academic performance in the program.

For more information contact Michael Rudder at (202) 453-8846, Office of English Language Programs ECA/A/L; Fax: (202) 453-8858; email: RudderME@state.gov.

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Grant Opportunity: E-Teacher Scholarship Program and Professional Development Workshop

Online Staff, Blackboard Loss, Turnitin Win, Internet Costs, AAUP, eTextbooks, Mobile Learning, World Digital Library, Grant

Don’t Starve the Staff of Online Programs
April 20, 2009, Inside Higher Ed
by Cam Cruikshank

“In California, and to a lesser extent in many states, the problem of overcrowded community colleges and public universities is getting worse. To address this problem, many institutions are choosing to offer online programs, and students are enrolling. While online degree programs can help solve this crisis, there are program delivery, retention and degree-completion challenges posed by this type of learning that must be addressed if we are to serve students well.”

“A survey published this month by the League for Innovation in the Community College and the Campus Computing Project reports that community colleges are seeing increased enrollment in every major type of program, especially online programs.  The survey author reports that while colleges are hiring new faculty to serve this growing population, they are reducing the number of positions for academic counselors and others who help students, especially as they expand online offerings. He questioned the online expansion without the accompanying academic support.”

“I question it, too. Online degree programs offer solutions to overcrowded physical classrooms, and they provide a lower-cost, convenient alternative for students who want a college education but can’t attend a residential institution for any number of reasons. However, launching an online degree program is not as simple as hiring adjunct professors and teaching courses that have been used in a physical campus setting. To do it right, you need a good learning management system, faculty who are experienced and effective online teachers, training and instructional design support, IT support and online tutors.  Of equal importance is an enhanced level of student support, especially help with financing a college education and with navigating the complex bureaucracy that we call higher education.” …

In Preliminary Ruling, Patent Office Rejects Blackboard’s Claims
by Jeffrey R. Young
April 20, 2009, Chronicle of Higher Ed

“Last week the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a preliminary ruling rejecting all 57 claims in a software patent that Blackboard Inc. used to successfully sue rival Desire2Learn for infringement. But the long-running patent battle between the two providers of course-management software is far from over, and the re-examination process could drag on for years because of the many chances that Blackboard has to appeal.”

“Blackboard was granted the patent in question — No. 6,988,138, described as an “Internet-based-education support system and methods” — in January 2006, but the patent office agreed to review it a year later after critics of the company argued that the patent was overly broad and covered software practices that had been in use by colleges and other companies for years at the time it was filed. In the latest ruling, the patent examiner essentially agreed with those arguments.” . . .

Students Lose, Fair Use Wins in Suit Targeting Anti-Plagiarism Tool
April 20, 2009, Chronicle of Higher Ed

“Students have suffered another defeat in their legal fight against the company that runs a plagiarism-detection tool popular among professors.  A federal appeals court last week affirmed a lower court’s decision that the Turnitin service does not violate the copyright of students, even though it stores digital copies of their essays in the database that the company uses to check works for academic dishonesty.” . .

“The legal battle began in 2007, when four high-school students sued iParadigms, the company that runs Turnitin, arguing that the company took their papers against their will and profited from using them. The students’ high schools required papers to be checked for plagiarism using Turnitin. The service adds scanned papers to its database.”

“U.S. District Court Judge Claude M. Hilton had found that scanning the student papers to detect plagiarism is a “highly transformative” use that falls under the fair-use provision of copyright law. Mr. Hilton ruled that the company ‘makes no use of any work’s particular expressive or creative content beyond the limited use of comparison with other works,” and that the new use “provides a substantial public benefit.’ ”

As Costs Fall, Companies Push to Raise Internet Price
by Saul Hansell
April 19, 2009, New York Times

“Internet service providers want to end the all-you-can-eat plans and get their customers paying à la carte. But they are having a hard time closing the buffet line.  Faced with rising consumer protest and calls from members of Congress for new regulations, Time Warner Cable backed down last week from a plan to impose new fees on heavy users of its Road Runner Internet service.”

“The debate over the price of Internet use is far from over. Critics say cable and phone companies are already charging far more than Internet providers in other countries. Some also wonder whether the new price plans are meant to prevent online video sites from cutting into the lucrative revenue from cable TV service.” …

Online Study Ups Workload for Instructors
by Michelle Rupe Eubanks
April 18, 2009, Times Daily.com

” ‘The economic underpinning of a lot of online education is that it amounts to slave labor,’ said Martin Snyder, president of the American Association of University Professors, which is based in Washington, D.C.  ‘Most of (those who teach online courses) are part-time professors who can’t get full-time work and are forced into taking a lot of part-time positions in order to try to make an equitable salary,’ Snyder said.

“In addition to inadequate compensation, he said, it takes a large amount of time to teach and develop these courses.  ‘My experience is that it takes much longer to both prepare and deliver an online class, and the biggest reason for that is that you find yourself repeating things that might be more efficient to say to a whole group of students,’ Snyder said. ‘And, if the teacher allows it to get out of hand, having the students e-mail constantly can be difficult, and you have to exercise an amount of control over that.’ ”

The Chronicle of Higher Education referenced this interview in its article, “AAUP: Online Education Based on ‘Slave Labor’,” on April 22, 2009, http://chronicle.com/wiredcampus/article/3727/aaup-online-education-based-on-slave-labor?utm_source=at&utm_medium=en

Linden Lab Ushers in New Era of Second Life with Initiative to Customize The Experience for Each User
April 21, 2009, Linden Labs

“Linden Lab, creator of the virtual world Second Life, today announced a series of initiatives aimed at making the Second Life experience more customizable for its global user base. By enabling individual users to filter content by adjusting their search settings, Linden Lab is able to preserve the founding principles of Second Life while evolving the medium to better serve the needs of its growing and increasingly diverse community. This will provide a more predictable experience for Second Life users, a group that contains a blend of consumers, companies and cultures from around the world.” . . .

A River Runs Alongside It
by Elizabeth Redden
April 17, 2009, Inside Higher Ed

“It’s a first year with an unusual end. Valley City on Wednesday announced it would move all instruction online for the remainder of the semester, as the Sheyenne River rose to record levels and officials called for an evacuation of the city’s flood plain (where much of the university is located).” . . .

“Given the timing, ‘this is really an alternative that makes the most sense,’ Shirley said in an interview. ‘The fact is, we’re a technology-enhanced campus and a laptop campus [in that every student is issued a laptop]. There’s a chance for us to shine in this. It’s what our faculty are trained and equipped to do.’ ” . . .

College Bookstores Move to Put Electronic Textbooks on Their Shelves
by Jeffrey Young
April 16, 2009, Chronicle of Higher Education

“It will now be easier for students to find electronic versions of textbooks at several college bookstores, thanks to a new partnership between textbook publishers and an association of college booksellers. But will students choose the paperless option?”

“The arrangement, announced this week, will give more prominent placement at dozens of college bookstores to electronic textbooks offered through CourseSmart, a venture owned by five major textbook companies. The deal involves CourseSmart and the Collegiate Retail Alliance, which represents 52 independent college bookstores.” . . .

Mobile Learning: Transforming the Delivery of Education and Training
Edited by Mohamed Ally
March 2009, Athabasca University Press

This collection is for anyone interested in the use of mobile technology for various distance learning applications. Readers will discover how to design learning materials for delivery on mobile technology and become familiar with the best practices of other educators, trainers, and researchers in the field, as well as the most recent initiatives in mobile learning research. Businesses and governments can learn how to deliver timely information to staff using mobile devices. Professors can use this book as a textbook for courses on distance education, mobile learning, and educational technology.  The book is available for purchase or as an ebook download.  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. It may be reproduced for non-commercial purposes, provided that the original author is credited.

Mohamed Ally is a Professor in the Centre for Distance Education at Athabasca University, where he teaches and researches the educational uses of mobile technology, mobile libraries, and workplace learning. Dr. Ally is on the boards of the International Federation of Training & Development Organizations and the International Association of Mobile Learning.

World Digital Library

UNESCO has launched the freely-accessible World Digital Library. The public version features high-quality digital items with content from more than two dozen institutions reflecting the cultural heritage of all UNESCO member countries. The library will continue to add content and enlist new partners from the widest possible range of UNESCO members.

The site offers:

1. Consistent metadata: Each item is described by a consistent set of bibliographic information (or metadata) relating to its geographical, temporal, and topical coverage, among other requirements. Consistent metadata provides the foundation for a site that is easy and interesting to explore, and that helps to reveal connections between items. The metadata also improves exposure to external search engines.

2. Description: Among the most impressive features of the WDL are descriptions of each item, answering the questions: “What is this item and why is it significant?” This information, written by curators and other experts, provides vital context for users and is designed to spark the curiosity of students and the general public to learn more about the cultural heritage of all countries.

3. Multilingualism: The metadata, navigation, and supporting content (e.g., curator videos) are translated into seven languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. This feature lengthened site development and complicates maintenance, but brings WDL closer to the goal of being truly universal.

4. Digital library technical development: The WDL team’s work with state-of-the art tools and technologies led to advances in cataloging and multilingual Web site development:

* A new cataloging application was developed to support the metadata requirements.

* A centralized tool with a translation memory was used, which prevents translators from having to translate the same word or phrase twice.

* An interface was developed, which features the WDL content in ways that are appealing to nontraditional users and that encourage exploration of primary sources.

* New technologies continue to be developed, improving workflow and reducing the time elapsed between content selection and availability on the site.

5. Collaborative network: The WDL emphasizes openness in all aspects of the project: access to content; technology transfer for capacity building; and partner, stakeholder, and user participation. Technical and programmatic networks are seen as vital to WDL’s sustainability and growth.

Grant Opportunity: Violence Against Women National On-Line Resource Center and E-Learning Community of Practice
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Application Deadline: June 5, 2009, Letter of Intent due May 6, 2009
Number of Awards: 2Program Funding: $730,000

The purpose of this announcement is to support online resources and professional training for practitioners working to prevent intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence (SV). This program is designed to increase knowledge about the primary prevention of IPV and SV and to build capacity among local, state, tribal and national agencies and organizations to develop, implement and evaluate IPV and SV prevention programs. In addition, the program will build upon previous efforts funded under FOA 04066 to enhance practitioners’ ability to address IPV and SV using a public health approach. The estimated funding date is prior to Aug. 31, 2009.

Online Staff, Blackboard Loss, Turnitin Win, Internet Costs, AAUP, eTextbooks, Mobile Learning, World Digital Library, Grant

Edupunk Rules, DE Enrollments, Sloan Foundation, Out-of-Print Books, Managing Change, Career Tech Ed, Ed Videos, Collaboration Tools

Edupunk Rules: Technology I, II and 3 – Understanding and Improving the Practice of Instructional Technology
by David Jones
April 9, 2009, The Web blog of David Jones

“The following is a summary and perhaps a bit of a reflection on McDonald and Gibbons (nd). This is a journal article that has been accepted, but not yet officially published. It appears to be based on the PhD thesis of McDonald.”

“The paper uses the criteria of technology I, II and III to examine differences between researchers description of a theory and how practitioners implement it. This identifies 3 reasons for technological gravity and 3 approaches to avoid it.”

“As I’ve read the paper and connected that with stuff I’m talking about and reading at the moment, this has evolved into something that makes connections between Technology III and the Edupunk movement. Somewhat off topic, but it looks like a connection.”

Rise in Distance Enrollments
by Scott Jaschik
April 6, 2009, Inside Higher Ed

“Community colleges continue to see increases in distance education enrollments, according to a report released at the annual meeting of the American Association of Community Colleges here.”

“A national survey of colleges by the Instructional Technology Council, an affiliate of the community college group, found that distance enrollments grew 11.3 percent from fall 2006 to fall 2007, the most recent period for which full data are available. Last year, the survey found an increase of 18 percent over the previous year. Given several recent years of significant gains in distance enrollments, such increases “could not be sustained indefinitely,” says the report. It also notes that the administrators who provided answers for the survey said that they faced resource constraints on expanding distance programs.”

“Indeed the top three challenges listed by distance education administrators in the survey, identical to last year’s results, all related to resources needed to expand distance programs while keeping them at high quality: support staff for training and technical assistance, student services for distance students, and operating and equipment budgets.”

“Even if the rate of growth has slowed, the report notes that distance enrollments are increasing at a faster rate than are other enrollments. And in a further sign that distance enrollments are not likely to plateau any time soon, the study notes that 70 percent of respondents said that student demand for distance options at their institutions exceeds current offerings.”  . . .

Note that ITC mailed two copies of this report to every ITC member, one to every community college president.  It is available online at http://www.itcnetwork.org/

Sloan Foundation Ends Major Grant Program for Online Education
by Marc Parry
April 6, 2009, Chronicle of Higher Education

“The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is closing its online-education grant program, a foundation official has told The Chronicle. Some college officials are concerned that the decision will leave a fast-growing sector of American higher education without a major source of support.”

“The New York City-based foundation has funneled roughly $80-million since the early 1990s into online-education ventures around the country. The philanthropy’s impending withdrawal has aroused anxiety about what will fill the vacuum. Robert Kaleta, director of the Learning Technology Center at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, compared the change to losing a parent ‘who has always been there to support, guide and encourage us.’ ” . . .

“The most recent report from the Sloan Consortium, a foundation spinoff that promotes online education, said that more than 3.9 million students took at least one online course during the fall-2007 term. That represented a healthy 12-percent increase over the previous year.”

“In a statement e-mailed to The Chronicle, Paul L. Joskow, president of the foundation, said the online-education program ‘has largely achieved its goals and grown to a point where the foundation’s support will soon no longer be necessary.’ ”  Mr. Mayadas described the program as ‘effectively closed,’ since the grants being made now ‘are almost exclusively already in the pipeline.’ He plans to leave Sloan at the end of this year.”

Google’s Plan for Out-of-Print Books Is Challenged
by Miguel Helft
April 3, 2009, New York Times

. . . “Now millions of orphan books may get a new legal guardian. Google has been scanning the pages of those books and others as part of its plan to bring a digital library and bookstore, unprecedented in scope, to computer screens across the United States. But a growing chorus is complaining that a far-reaching settlement of a suit brought against Google by publishers and authors is about to grant the company too much power over orphan works.”

“These critics say the settlement, which is subject to court approval, will give Google virtually exclusive rights to publish the books online and to profit from them. Some academics and public interest groups plan to file legal briefs objecting to this and other parts of the settlement in coming weeks, before a review by a federal judge in June. While most orphan books are obscure, in aggregate they are a valuable, broad swath of 20th-century literature and scholarship.”

“Determining which books are orphans is difficult, but specialists say orphan works could make up the bulk of the collections of some major libraries. Critics say that without the orphan books, no competitor will ever be able to compile the comprehensive online library Google aims to create, giving the company more control than ever over the realm of digital information. And without competition, they say, Google will be able to charge universities and others high prices for access to its database.”

“The settlement, “takes the vast bulk of books that are in research libraries and makes them into a single database that is the property of Google,” said Robert Darnton, head of the Harvard University library system. “Google will be a monopoly.”  Google, which has scanned more than seven million books from the collections of major libraries at its own expense, vigorously defends the settlement, saying it will bring great benefits to the broader public. And it says others could make similar deals.” . . .

Implementing an Institution-wide Learning and Teaching Strategy: Lessons in Managing Change
by David Jones
March 30, 2009, The Web blog of David Jones

“The following is a summary and possibly some reflection on Newton (2003). I’m still trying to decide if, as I read literature associated with the PhD, if I should take the time to produce these summaries. I wonder if, instead, I should concentrate on writing the thesis….  Essentially illustrates that academics have different perspectives of strategy than management – SNAFU principle perhaps. Suggests need for better understanding of change and policy implementation. Reinforces much of what I think, some nice references, but doesn’t necessarily indicate an appreciation of or if ateleological approaches might be more appropriate.” . . .

Career/Technical Education Web site

The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) within the Institute of Education Sciences has just updated the Career/Technical Education Statistics (CTES) Web site.

The CTES Web site includes tables describing career/technical education (CTE) at three levels: 1) secondary/high school CTE, 2) postsecondary/college career education, and 3) adult education for work. These tables are updated periodically to incorporate new CTE-related topics and data from new surveys. In this update, two sets of tables were added to the postsecondary/college career education tables:  1) a set of 21 tables with state-level information on institutional offerings and credentials awarded in CTE, and 2)  a set of 7 tables describing CTE students’ enrollment characteristics, for the 12 states that were oversampled in the 2003-04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study.

Academic Earth: Thousands of Video Lectures from the World’s Top Scholars

The site features lectures from Berkeley, Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Stanford, and Yale. Richard Ludlow, the site’s creator, and his staff are working on tools that will allow users to post questions and answers, browse video transcripts, and search within the videos themselves for specific clips. He claims the site had more than 200,000 unique visitors in February.  The site’s mission is to build “a user-friendly educational ecosystem that will give internet users around the world the ability to easily find, interact with, and learn from full video courses and lectures from the world’s leading scholars.  Our goal is to bring the best content together in one place and create an environment in which that content is remarkably easy to use and where user contributions make existing content increasingly valuable.”

Best Collaboration Tools 2009
by Robin Good

George Siemens writes, “Even those who are well versed in collaboration software will be hard pressed to not find at least a few tools they haven’t encountered before…”

Edupunk Rules, DE Enrollments, Sloan Foundation, Out-of-Print Books, Managing Change, Career Tech Ed, Ed Videos, Collaboration Tools

Add Your Name to Ballot to Serve on the ITC Board as the Southeast Regional Representative: Respond by April 17

I am sad to report that Monica Sasscer, ITC’s south central regional representative, will be resigning from Northern Virginia Community College at the end of April so she will be unable to serve out her term on the ITC board of directors as the southeastern regional representative through June 30, 2010.  I know she regrets having to leave ITC, but we wish her all the best in her retirement!

We are looking for candidates from ITC’s southeast region to add their names to the ballot to serve out the remainder of Monica’s term on the ITC board.

Candidates for this position should plan to attend three face-to-face two-day board meetings — this year the annual summer board retreat will be on July 29-31 in Huntington Beach, California;  a fall meeting during the first week of November in Washington, DC;  and the annual eLearning conference in February 2010.

These meetings are supplemented by monthly audioconferences – the board is scheduled to meet on May 14 and June 11 from 1:30 to 3:00 eastern time and will decide on the dates and times for the upcoming year of monthly meetings when it meets this summer.  ITC does not reimburse its board members for travel expenses, however we do provide a complementary registration to attend the eLearning conference.

Please respond to this e-mail before Friday, April 17 if you are interested in serving on the ITC Board of Directors as the south central regional representative.

I will need a three-paragraph description which states why you feel qualified to represent your region on the ITC board of directors. I will include this description in the special election ballot we send to the members in this region.

The ITC southeast region includes ITC members located in the following states:

Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia

The duties of the ITC regional representative include:

– Organize and serve as chair of a regional ITC committee, representing a diverse cross-section of the regional membership;

– Contact new members in your region to introduce their organization to ITC activities and services and identify areas of special interest;

– Communicate regularly with regional members to solicit award nominations and articles or information for the ITC News. Remind regional members about ITC activities and requests for action on pending federal legislation. Serve as an information/referral source to answer questions and concerns of regional members;

– Provide overall guidance to and take responsibility for conducting regional conferences by chairing or appointing a chair for the conference planning committee and orchestrating the appointment of the committee members;

– Plan and/or implement regional membership drives;

– Serve as an active member of the ITC Board by participating in regular meetings and conference calls, serve ITC related commissions and committees as needed, and take a general leadership role in the planning and implementation of ITC national activities.

Thank you for your interest in helping ITC in its mission to provide exceptional leadership and professional development to its network of eLearning experts by advocating, collaborating, researching, and sharing exemplary, innovative practices and potential in learning technologies.

Add Your Name to Ballot to Serve on the ITC Board as the Southeast Regional Representative: Respond by April 17

Put Your Name on the Election Ballot to Serve on the ITC Board of Directors as a Regional Representative

If interested, you must respond by Friday, April 17, 2009

We invite you to add your name to the ITC 2009 ballot to serve as a regional representative on the ITC board of directors!  We are looking for ITC institutional members located in the north central, south central and international regions to serve as a regional representative on the ITC board of directors.

ITC regional representatives serve on the ITC board for two years and must attend three face-to-face, two-day board meetings each year (this year the annual summer board retreat will be on July 29-31 in Huntington Beach, California, a fall meeting during the first week of November in Washington, DC, and the annual eLearning conference in February 2010).  These meetings are supplemented by monthly audioconferences.  ITC does not reimburse its board members for travel expenses, however we do provide a complementary registration to attend the eLearning conference.

To be included on the ITC ballot, you must fax a letter to me at 202-822-5014 that expresses support from your institution for your participation on the ITC board.  This letter should show that you will receive financial support to attend three face-to-face meetings annually.  We will also need a three-paragraph description of why you feel qualified to represent your region on the ITC board of directors.  We will include this statement in the ballot that we send to the ITC members in you region.

ITC will conduct a mail-in ballot at the end of April 2009. The new representatives will begin their term at the ITC summer board retreat in July 2009.

The ITC north central region includes: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin

The ITC south central region includes: Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas

The ITC international region: All colleges located outside the United States

You can find the ITC member colleges in each region using the search feature on the ITC Web site at: http://www.itcnetwork.org/mod/glossary/view.php?id=35

The duties of the ITC regional representative include:

– Organize and serve as chair of a regional ITC committee, representing a diverse cross-section of the regional membership;

– Contact new members in your region to introduce their organization to ITC activities and services and identify areas of special interest;

– Communicate regularly with regional members to solicit award nominations and articles or information for the ITC News.  Remind regional members about ITC activities and requests for action on pending federal legislation.  Serve as an information/referral source to answer questions and concerns of regional members;

– Provide overall guidance to and take responsibility for conducting regional conferences by chairing or appointing a chair for the conference planning committee and orchestrating the appointment of the committee members;

– Plan and/or implement regional membership drives;

– Serve as an active member of the ITC Board by participating in regular meetings and conference calls, serve ITC related commissions and committees as needed, and take a general leadership role in the planning and implementation of ITC national activities.

Please convey your interest in being included on the ITC 2009 ballot to me before Friday, April 17, 2009.  Thank you for your interest in helping ITC in its mission to provide leadership, information and resources to expand and enhance distance learning through the effective use of technology.

Put Your Name on the Election Ballot to Serve on the ITC Board of Directors as a Regional Representative