Two Position Openings at Virginia Tech: Director and Assistant Director

Here are two job postings at Virginia Tech located in Blacksburg, Virginia. Chris.

Director of the Institute for Distance and Distributed Learning (IDDL)

Responsibilities: Reports to the Associate Provost for Distance Learning and Summer Sessions, providing leadership and management to the Institute for Distance and Distributed Learning (IDDL) and ensuring a holistic approach to eLearning through a collaborative cross-university approach. The Director evaluates online and distance learning opportunities and is responsible for university-wide distance and distributed learning program planning; course development and delivery; eLearning systems development and integration with university systems; student and faculty support services; course and program assessment, and provides leadership in the development of new and scalable models of eLearning. The IDDL is comprised of three units: Instructional Design, Development and Support; eLearning Systems Development and Integration; and Research and Assessment of Teaching and Learning in Electronic Environments. Each unit’s Assistant Director reports to the Director.

Qualifications: Specific experience working in a distance learning environment; demonstrated higher education experience related to a wide diversity of faculty, staff, students and community members; possess outstanding leadership, management, and interpersonal skills; a demonstrated ability to work in a diverse team environment; demonstrated experience managing a complex organization, including responsibility for staff and budgets; and able to demonstrate a proven commitment to supporting and enhancing a culturally rich and diverse learning environment. A masters degree is required, and a terminal degree is preferred.

Salary: Salary and benefits are competitive and commensurate with preparation and experience.

To Apply: For more information and to apply on-line, go to http://jobs.vt.edu, posting # 071233. To be assured of full consideration, applications should be received by January 28, 2008. The position will remain open until filled. Virginia Tech has a strong commitment to the principle of diversity and, in that spirit, seeks a broad spectrum of candidates including women, minorities, and people with disabilities.

Assistant Director for eLearning Systems Development and Integration

Responsibilities: Reports to the Director of the Institute for Distance and Distributed Learning (IDDL) and is responsible for systems and applications, support of learners and faculty; the eLearning infrastructure, support of appropriate eLearning technology integration; ensuring that IDDL data is accurate, secure and easily accessible; serves as the project manager to address technical, systems and process barriers to eLearning; and ensures a seamless technology presence for students and faculty. The Assistant Director coordinates IDDL efforts to examine emerging eLearning technologies and tests and evaluates these technologies for integration into the University’s teaching and learning systems.

Qualifications: Candidates should have increasingly-responsible professional work experience in instructional/information technology in an institution of higher education; experience working in complex organizations with cross-functional teams comprised of creative individuals; excellent project management skills; and excellent communication skills, including the ability to communicate effectively with faculty, staff, administrators and students Candidates must be able to demonstrate a proven commitment to supporting and enhancing a culturally rich and diverse learning environment. A technical bachelor’s degree in computer science, instructional technology or information technology is required. A similar or related graduate degree is preferred.

Salary: Salary and benefits are competitive and commensurate with preparation and experience.

To Apply: For more information and to apply on-line, go to http://jobs.vt.edu, posting # 071234. Complete the faculty application and attach a resume, cover letter, and a list of three professional references. To be assured of full consideration, applications should be received by January 28, 2007. The position will remain open until filled. Virginia Tech has a strong commitment to the principle of diversity and, in that spirit, seeks a broad spectrum of candidates including women, minorities, and people with disabilities.

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Two Position Openings at Virginia Tech: Director and Assistant Director

PTFP Announces Application Deadline for FY2008 Grant Round: Feb. 22, 2008

Public Telecommunications Facilities Program (PTFP)
National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA)
Department of Commerce

The PTFP has just announced that Feb. 22, 2008 is the deadline for applications to receive funds through its FY2008 grant round. This grant program has helped many ITC members purchase the equipment they needed to construct or expand their distance learning programs (most through the non-broadcast technologies category). I encourage you to contact Bob Sestili if you have any questions or would like to run an idea by him to see if he thinks your program could receive funding through PTFP.

The Public Telecommunications Facilities Program (PTFP) assists, through matching grants, in the planning and construction of public telecommunications facilities in order to:

(1) extend delivery of services to as many citizens as possible by the most cost-effective means, including use of broadcast and non-broadcast technologies;
(2) increase public telecommunications services and facilities available to, operated by, and controlled by minorities and women;
(3) strengthen the capability of existing public television and radio stations to provide public telecommunications services to the public.

Funds Available: $16.8 million

Application Deadline: Feb. 22, 2008, 5 pm Eastern Time

Eligible Applicants: To apply for and receive a PTFP Construction or Planning Grant, an applicant must be: (a) a public or noncommercial educational broadcast station; (b) a noncommercial telecommunications entity; (c) a system of public telecommunications entities; (d) a non-profit foundation, corporation, institution, or association organized primarily for educational or cultural purposes; or (e) a state, local, or Indian tribal government (or agency thereof), or a political or special purpose subdivision of a state.

For more information: Robert Sestili, Senior Program Officer, 202-482-5802

Distance Learning and Nonbroadcast Projects

NTIA encourages applications for innovative or unique distance learning projects which address demonstrated and substantial community needs. For fiscal year 2007, NTIA awarded $274,900 in funds to 4 grantees for distance learning projects. The awards ranged from $60,560 to $86,079.

The growth of digital technologies provides new opportunities for distance learning projects using both broadcast and nonbroadcast facilities. NTIA encourages applicants to consider the use of digital technologies in proposing unique or innovative distance learning projects for funding in FY 2008. Examples of innovative digital applications include projects (1) which use broadband technologies for distance learning, (2) which distribute educational or informational programming via Direct Broadcast Satellite technologies, (3) which provide multi-media content using the digital television transmission infrastructure and delivered through a method that is not a typical broadcast channel, or (4) which incorporate video, voice, graphics and data capabilities for online distance learning services. NTIA also encourages applicants to consider broadcast projects which use the multi-channel capacity of digital television to provide innovative distance learning projects.

All distance learning applications must address substantial and demonstrated needs of the communities being served. NTIA is particularly interested in distance learning projects which benefit traditionally underserved audiences, such as projects serving minorities, people living in rural communities, or those living in disadvantaged areas where distance learning services will provide significant educational opportunities.

NTIA recognizes that, due to the multi-channel capability of digital television broadcast station’s distance learning components may well be a part of a broadcast television digital conversion application. NTIA will, therefore, consider such distance learning proposals under the subpriorities established in the section related to Television Broadcasting and Digital Conversion. If NTIA determines that a broadcast distance learning project is not part of a digital conversion application, NTIA will evaluate the application pursuant to §§ 2301.4(b)(6) and 2301.17 of the PTFP Final Rules.

PTFP Announces Application Deadline for FY2008 Grant Round: Feb. 22, 2008

Generation Y Use of Libraries, Teens and Social Media, e-Textbooks, ADA and Course Mgmt, Three Articles on Trends

Happy New Year!! Welcome back! We hope you and your family had a wonderful holiday! Here are some news articles that you might have missed! Chris.

Information Searches That Solve Problems
by Lee Rainie
Dec. 30, 2007, Pew Internet and American Life Project

“There are several major findings in this report. One is this: For help with a variety of common problems, more people turn to the internet than consult experts or family members to provide information and resources. Another key insight is that members of Gen Y are the leading users of libraries for help solving problems and in more general patronage.” . . .

“The survey results challenge the assumption that libraries are losing relevance in the internet age. Libraries drew visits by more than half of Americans (53%) in the past year for all kinds of purposes, not just the problems mentioned in this survey. And it was the young adults in tech-loving Generation Y (age 18-30) who led the pack. Compared to their elders, Gen Y members were the most likely to use libraries for problem-solving information and in general patronage for any purpose.”

“Furthermore, it is young adults who are the most likely to say they will use libraries in the future when they encounter problems: 40% of Gen Y said they would do that, compared with 20% of those above age 30 who say they would go to a library.” . . .

Teens and Social Media: The Use of Social Media Gains a Greater Foothold in Teen Life as They Embrace the Conversational Nature of Interactive Online Media
by Amanda Lenhart, Mary Madden, Alexandra Rankin Macgill, and Aaron Smith
Dec. 19, 2007, Pew Internet and American Life Project

“Content creation by teenagers continues to grow, with 64% of online teenagers ages 12 to 17 engaging in at least one type of content creation, up from 57% of online teens in 2004.”

“Girls continue to dominate most elements of content creation. Some 35% of all teen girls blog, compared with 20% of online boys, and 54% of wired girls post photos online compared with 40% of online boys. Boys, however, do dominate one area – posting of video content online. Online teen boys are nearly twice as likely as online girls (19% vs. 10%) to have posted a video online somewhere where someone else could see it.”

“The survey found that content creation is not just about sharing creative output; it is also about participating in conversations fueled by that content. Nearly half (47%) of online teens have posted photos where others can see them, and 89% of those teens who post photos say that people comment on the images at least ‘some of the time.’ “

“However, many teen content creators do not simply plaster their creative endeavors on the Web for anyone to view; many teens limit access to content that they share.”

“There is a subset of teens who are super-communicators — teens who have a host of technology options for dealing with family and friends, including traditional landline phones, cell phones, texting, social network sites, instant messaging, and email. They represent about 28% of the entire teen population and they are more likely to be older girls.”

E-Textbooks – for Real This Time?
by Andy Guess
Jan. 3, 2008, Inside Higher Ed

“It’s the central paradox of 21st-century college students: Despite embracing radically new ways of communicating with each other and learning about the world, they still remain wedded to the old-fashioned, paper-bound textbook.”

“That steadfast commitment to the printed page isn’t shared only by students. But sensing an opportunity among early adopters – and possibly signaling a shift in people’s preferences – two companies recently bet that the time is ripe for nudging a change in reading habits. So far, it’s too early to tell whether Amazon’s Kindle and Sony’s Reader Digital Book will be considered a success at luring customers willing to try out a new paradigm; like many promising technologies before it, e-books have perpetually remained on the verge of taking off. But those hardware devices, and other efforts sure to come down the pipeline in the near future, echo a broader attempt by companies across the publishing world to apply the technology and economics of iTunes to the written word.” . . .

Judge Finds University Didn’t Discriminate Online
by Hurley Goodall
Jan. 3, 2008, Chronicle of Higher Education

“A federal judge dismissed a long-standing lawsuit against Capella University that had claimed the online university’s course-management software discriminated against people with disabilities. The judge decided that a former student was not disabled under the Americans With Disabilities Act. Even if he was, the judge said, the institution had provided reasonable accommodations.”

“Details of this decision came from a U.S. District Court memorandum last month. In the lawsuit, Jeffry La Marca, who argued he had cognitive and memory disorders, said problems arising from the university’s switch to WebCT, an online course-management program, prevented him from fully accessing course material. He also said the university did not sufficiently accommodate him despite his disability.”

“However, Judge Marc L. Goldman of the Central District in California wrote in his decision that La Marca’s disabilities did not substantially limit his capacity to learn given his past academic success. In regard to accommodations, Capella offered “one-on-one interaction with instructors,” according to the court document, and “a directed study program would have addressed every issue [the] Plaintiff raised.” Capella suspended La Marca from the university after he wrote several complaints on a class discussion board in 2004. He said the action was discriminatory, and in retaliation against his complaints about WebCT. The judge wrote that he did not find La Marca’s suspension to be either – rather, it was an action to stop his disruptive posts on a class discussion board.”

Ten Learning Technologies to Transform Training in 2008
by Gary Woodill
Jan. 3, 2008

“So what ten learning technologies should be the focus of my 2008 workshops and webinars? Here is my list (but I would love to hear yours).”

The New Education Agenda
by Gordon Freedman
Jan. 2, 2008, Blackboard, Inc.

Gordon Freedman, Blackboard’s VP of education strategy, “reflects on technology and education as he travels around the world to meet with innovative education leaders and researchers, government leaders, and Blackboard clients who are experimenting in e-Learning and changing the education landscape.”

Why 2008 Will be a Bad Year for Microsoft’s Ed Tech Market Share
by Christopher Dawson
Jan. 1, 2008, ZDNet

…”it doesn’t take Linux Torvalds to see the hurdles Microsoft faces in our market. The greatest is probably the students themselves. These students have little or no conception of copyright laws or intellectual property. They use Works because it came with their computer, but few could conceive of actually plunking down money for full-blown Office. As Microsoft anti-piracy technology becomes even more effective, their ability to “just download a copy” (again, with no thought to the legality of such an action) diminishes. More and more students are turning to open source alternatives that they actually can “just download” (for free, and legally!).”

Generation Y Use of Libraries, Teens and Social Media, e-Textbooks, ADA and Course Mgmt, Three Articles on Trends